Saving, spending, giving – for kids!

An author I’ve worked with in the past reached out to me recently about her new children’s book, “Nana’s 3 Jars“, so I was thrilled to accept a copy for review. Carol Round’s previous book I’d worked with her on was “Journaling with Jesus” about prayer journaling for adults. I took part in her challenge – journaling daily during Lent – and saw a huge difference in my thinking as I did so. So, when Carol asked me to read her book with my boys, I was happy to do it!

3 jarsEven before we opened the book, Max was excited. “It’s for 3 year olds!” he said (because of the 3 on the cover). Once we opened it and started reading, he immediately related to the boy and girl in the story who were on their way to Nana’s house to spend the day. Our boys spent two nights with my parents recently and did all sorts of fun things – including playing with all the big kids at church who my parents teach in Sunday school. Max loved it. (Mason is happy anytime people smile at him, talk to him, or hold him, at this point, which means he’s a very happy baby!)

In the story, the sister and brother learn from Nana what it means to set apart money for spending, for saving, and for giving. This financial lesson is one that I’m convinced we all need. I love the idea of teaching it right from the beginning of a child’s understanding about money. One way the children in the story internalize the lesson is by using some of the giving money to buy ingredients and make cookies, which they then take to share with veterans.

One of Max’s favorite things to do is help make dishes in the kitchen. We’ve been on a waffle kick lately, since my waffle maker is so easy to use. He loves pouring in each ingredient, stirring, and watching the ingredients become a meal or a “dessert item” as he calls them. That has to come from the babysitter 🙂 Carol includes a chocolate chip cookies recipe that I’m dying to try!

For the financial lesson and the recipe especially, “Nana’s 3 Jars” deserves 4 snacks:

Snacks, Gerber

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